Monday, 25 February 2013

Slightly Stopped

Slightly Stooped is an American band based in Ocean Beach, San Diego, California, who describe their music as "a fusion of folk, rock, reggae and blues with hip-hop, funk, metal and punk." As a band, they have released eight albums (two live) with their seventh studio album entitled "Top of the World" on August 14, 2012. The band was originally signed by Bradley Nowell from the band Sublime to his label Skunk Records while still in high school.

Monday, 30 July 2012


Sweetness is one of the five basic tastes and is almost universally regarded as a pleasurable experience. Foods rich in simple carbohydrates such as sugar are those most commonly associated with sweetness, although there are other natural and artificial compounds that are sweet at much lower concentrations, allowing their use as non-caloric sugar substitutes. Other compounds may alter perception of sweetness itself.

The chemosensory basis for detecting sweetness, which varies among both individuals and species, has only been teased apart in recent years. A recent theoretical model of sweetness is the multipoint attachment theory, which involves multiple binding sites between a sweetness receptor and a sweet substance.

Studies indicate that responsiveness to sugars and sweetness has very ancient evolutionary beginnings, being manifest as chemotaxis even in motile bacteria such as E. coli. Newborn human infants also demonstrate preferences for high sugar concentrations and prefer solutions that are sweeter than lactose, the sugar found in breast milk. Sweetness appears to have the highest taste recognition threshold, being detectable at around 1 part in 200 of sucrose in solution. By comparison, bitterness appears to have the lowest detection threshold, at about 1 part in 2 million for quinine in solution. In the natural settings that human primate ancestors evolved in, sweetness intensity should indicate energy density, while bitterness tends to indicate toxicity.

The high sweetness detection threshold and low bitterness detection threshold would have predisposed our primate ancestors to seek out sweet-tasting (and energy-dense) foods and avoid bitter-tasting foods. Even amongst leaf-eating primates, there is a tendency to prefer immature leaves, which tend to be higher in protein and lower in fibre and poisons than mature leaves. The 'sweet tooth' thus has an ancient evolutionary heritage, and while food processing has changed consumption patterns, human physiology remains largely unchanged.

Friday, 26 August 2011


Glitter describes an assortment of very small (roughly 1 mm²) pieces of copolymer plastics, aluminum foil, titanium dioxide, iron oxides, bismuth oxychloride or other materials painted in metallic, neon and iridescent colors to reflect light in a sparkling spectrum. Glitter is usually sold and stored in canisters somewhat similar to salt shakers, which have openings that control the flow of glitter. These canisters may contain one or many colors. It can be permanently applied with strong glue, or temporarily applied with other sticky materials, such as makeup. It is not to be confused with confetti, which contains larger pieces, and should also not be confused with sequins, which are larger yet.

Glitter is used in craft projects, especially for children, because of the brilliant effects which can be achieved relatively easily. Glitter is used as an element of decorations, and can be added to rubbers and plastics. It is also often put into cosmetic products like lip gloss and eyeshadow. Glittery cosmetics are popular with youth, but are also worn by adults.

Glitter was invented by Henry Ruschmann. Accounts conflict as to when glitter was invented—some say 1934 and others shortly after World War II.

The word "glitter" is often used euphemistically to refer to brilliantly gorgeous but superficial glamour. From this meaning comes the term glitterati to refer to pop stars and socialites. The word is derived from "glitter" and "literati".